Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 12, 2009

Our Patron- John Paul II

 

John Paul II

John Paul II

We still remember John Paul II and we will always do. We want to follow his teaching. Every 16 October we celebrate our Patron’s Day.
Here you can find some basic information about him.

 Pope. Born Karol Józef Wojtyla on May 18, 1920, in Wadowice, Poland. John Paul’s early life was marked by great loss. His mother died when he was nine and his older brother Edmund died when he was twelve.

Growing up, John Paul was athletic and enjoyed skiing and swimming. He went to Krakow’s Jagiellonian University in 1938 where he showed an interest in theater and poetry. The school was closed the next year by Nazi troops during the German occupation of Poland. Wanting to become a priest, John Paul began studying at a secret seminary run by the archbishop of Krakow. After World War II ended, he finished his religious studies at a Krakow seminary and was ordained in 1946.

John Paul spent two years in Rome where he finished his doctorate in theology. He returned to his native Poland in 1948 and served in several parishes in and around Krakow. John Paul became the bishop of Ombi in 1958 and then the archbishop of Krakow six years later. Considered one of the Catholic Church’s leading thinkers, he participated in the Second Vatican Council—sometimes called Vatican II. The council began reviewing church doctrine in 1962 and held several sessions over the course of the next few years. As a member of the council, John Paul helped the church to examine its position in the world. Well regarded for his contributions to the church, John Paul was made a cardinal in 1967 by Pope Paul VI.

In 1978, John Paul made history by becoming the first non-Italian pope in more than four hundred years. As the leader of the Catholic Church, he traveled the world, visiting more than 100 countries to spread his message of faith and peace. But he was close to home when he faced the greatest threat to his life. In 1981, an assassin shot John Paul twice in St. Peter’s Square in Vatican City. Fortunately, he was able to recover from his injuries and later forgave his attacker.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 12, 2009

Our Patron – Dimitrie Grecesu

He once said once that in science  good faith and truth are the most valuable things.

Dimitrie Grecescu was a modest person, avoiding noisy events, of great integrity and wide culture, which encompassed not only science but also literature, art, music. His professional activity was concentrated mainly in two directions, which he happily blended in: medicine and botany. Born in Cerneţi (Mehedinti), he attended the National School of Medicine and Pharmacy Carol Davila , institution which granted him the license in medicine (1863) and then he got his PhD in medicine, with a paper on medical botany (1868). He taught for many years (1869-1903) medical botany at the Faculty of Medicine of Bucharest, he was the manager of the Botanical Garden from Cotroceni and a member of the Romanian Academy (since 1907). At the same time, he worked as a military doctor, distinguishing especially during the Independence War.

Dimitrie Grecescu

Dimitrie Grecescu

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 11, 2009

Our Patron, Italy

In 2004, the school Liceo Scientifico has been dedicated  to Renato Caccioppoli. He was born on 20 January 1904, in Naples. His mother was Sofia Bakunin, daughter of Michele Bakunin.  Following  the wishes of his father, a known Neapolitan surgeon, Renato registered to Engineering, but then he attended  Mathematics. In 1925, he graduated at the University of Naples. In 1928, Renato qualified as an university teacher and then he went to Padua, where he won the competition for the chair of “Analisi Algebrica”. At the age of 28, the Academy of Lincei conferred him the national prize of the class of Physical Science. In 1934,he went back to Naples to teach The “Teoria dei Gruppi”, “ Analisi Superiore” and “Analisi Matematica”, until his death. His life was always quite problematic. His eccentric and nonconformist personality, profoundly antifascist, induced him to experiment the life of the vagrants and of poor people, he was arrested for mendacity. In 1938, he improvised a speech against Hitler and Mussolini, for this reason he was arrested and was interned in a mental home because people believed he was mad.  When he was released he continued to teach at university. Renato committed suicide in his home on 8 May 1959.

Our Patron

Our Patron

 

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 11, 2009

Our school in Scafati, Italy

The Liceo scientifico “Renato Caccioppoli” is a new building. It consists of 35 classrooms, offices,workshops and an informatics laboratory. There are also a library ,a hall to watch film and another one to listen to music. The building has got three floors.It is very sunny and is located in the plain just under the volcano Vesuvio.There is also a section of Liceo classico. In the school there aren’t only teenagers from Scafati, but also from neighbouring towns.

 

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 11, 2009

Scafati, Italy

Carmela team 

                                            OUR  TOWN SCAFATI

Scafati is a chaotic and dynamic town, an important industrial centre. The word “scafati” derives from the Latin word “scapha”, a means of transport used to sail the Sarno river. The story and the evolution of Scafati are tightly connected to his good geographic position between the two cities of Salerno and Naples and to the closeness to the town of Pompei. The first important settlements go back to the earthquake in 62 a.D and the eruption of the Vesuvio in 79 a.D.

The Palazzo Meyer (nowadays seat of the town hall) and the Wenner Park (a real green lung of the town) have a particular historic importance, they date back to XIX century.

During the Second World War Scafati was the protagonist of the first armed group resistant in South Italy, that contributed to the liberation of the territory from the Nazist invasion. In 1962 was assigned a gold medal to Scafati by the Associazione Nazionale Partigiani d’Italia.

 

 

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 11, 2009

Greetings from Romania

“Dimitrie Grecescu” school is the oldest school in our county. It is 157 years old and it consists of 8 classrooms, offices, one workshop, one informatics laboratory and one library. It is an old and beautifully decorated building, located in the center of the town. There are two churches near the school: a catholic one and an orthodox one and this help us to keep a close relationship with religion. It also includes a kindergarten with three groups. 

our_school-romania4

OUR SCHOOL

      

 

 

our_school-romania2

Posted by: piccolamela | February 9, 2009

February plan

By the end of February we present our schools, students and hometown and collect information on an important archaeological site of our area. We can also use pictures and comment them.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 8, 2009

Greetings from Daleszyce, Poland!

 

Our school

Our school

We are John Paul II Junior High School in Daleszyce, Poland. Daleszyce is a town situated in the Holy Cross region famous for its beautiful Holy Cross Mountains, which are said to be the oldest in Europe, yet they are not very high. Our school is very big. It’s blue outside, but we say it’s full of sunshine inside. It’s friendly. There are over 4000 students there, both boys and girls. The building is very modern – it has even got lifts if someone has got problems with walking (broken legs). Can you see our school building?

Daleszyce and the landscape

Daleszyce and the landscape

Posted by: piccolamela | February 4, 2009

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