Posted by: piccolamela | March 14, 2009

Pompei

Pompeii is one of the most important, beautiful and oldest town of the south Italy. It was found by the Oschi in the XVII BC.  as it was found a Doric fountain in the forum. Pompeii was a very important commercial centre not only because it was not far from the sea but also because the Vesuvius has given a very fertile  land  .

 In  89 B.C. the Romans conquered Pompeii. The Romans built in Pompeii the baths, a big amphitheatre, a lot of villas and roads, but above all the Romans built an aqueduct. It was  very important because before the Romans in Pompeii there weren’t  aqueducts. In  a.D.79 the Vesuvius, a big quiescent volcano, threw out violently and the prosperous Pompeii was flooded completely.

Now, the archaeologies have diged up more than 20% of the submerged lands. Every day Pompeii is invaded by tourists that visit the fascinating excavations.

 

 

 
 

 

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | March 12, 2009

The Holy Cross Mountains- the beginning

Goloborze /stones on the slope/

Goloborze /stones on the slope/

The Swietokrzyski National Park was established on May 1, l950. It covers the central, best-preserved part of the Swietokrzyskie Mountains (The Holy Cross Mountains). The mountains take their name from an old Benedictine Abbey, that is located on the Lysa Mountain. These mountains are, beside the Sudety Mountains, the oldest Polish mountain formations, and are built from Paleozoic rocks. The rich geological history of this area involved successive inundations by sea, transformations of sediments into rocks, and their folding. The main mountain-building movements, the Variscian movements, occurred here some 300 million years ago. In the Quaternary period the Swietokrzyskie Mountains were temporarily covered by glaciers, which formed the boulder fields known in the Polish language as goloborza, on the slopes of the highest peaks in the range.

The Holy Cross Mountains

The Holy Cross Mountains

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | March 8, 2009

Baltow and its history

Bałtów 150 million years ago A warm sea, inhabited by corals, brachiopods, bivalves, snails, sea urchins and ammonites, existed at the site of Bałtów during the Jurassic. Fossils discovered in Wólka Bałtowska enable us to suppose that nearby there was a land similar to the present-day coast of Florida, with dinosaurs wandering across white carbonate beaches, leaving their footprints.The white rocks surrounding Bałtów are a remnant of this sea. Numerous fossils, mainly stenothermal corals, can be found there.

Baltow and the sea a long time ago

Baltow and the sea a long time ago

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | March 5, 2009

Sightseeing in the park

Sightseeing at Baltow

Sightseeing at Baltow

Sightseeing of the park it is a journey in time through all geological periods. It begins when life appears on the Earth (Cambrian, 542 Ma before present), and ends when humans appear (Neolith). The biggest attraction are the models of dinosaurs of the original size, located along the route.

Dinosaurus

Dinosaurus

The most impressive attraction is the model of enormous Seismosaurus – the biggest sauropod in history (40 m long).

A special attention should be paid to the scenes from life of six zauropods and two teropodes, which were reconstructed according to the dinosaur pathways found in Sołtyków (eastward from Skarżysko Kamienna) by paleontologists of the Polish Geological Institute: Gerard Gierliński and Grzegorz Pieńkowski.

Dinosaur models were made with enormous care for making them as similar as possible to original ancient animals. They were consulted with specialists of the Polish Geological Institute.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | March 4, 2009

Kadzielnia Hill in Kielce

KADZIELNIA  Hill in Kielce. There  are beautiful rocks here, an amphitheatre for 7000 people. An old quarry, now geological reserve. On the calcium hill the rock quarry has exposed the complicates structure of the old chain of the Świętokrzyskie moutains, with the full profile of the old devon.

Kadzielnia Hill

Kadzielnia Hill

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 16, 2009

General Lyceum of Neapolis, Greece

GENIKO LYKEIO NEAPOLIS LAKONIAS      GREECE

The school belongs to Secondary Education of the Greek Educational System.
The students are between 15 and 18 years old. There are three classes 1st, 2nd and 3rd.By the end of the 3rd year the students take exams to graduate and enter the university.
The subjects taught include Greek language – both modern and ancient, Religious Education, History, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Modern Greek Literature, Computer Studies , Sociology, English Language, ( French is optional),Physical Education.
This year a team of students of all three classes, guided by the English teacher , the Chemistry teacher and the Greek language teacher of the school, are working on a project concerning the castles, the churches, the fortresses and the lighthouses of the area ,”

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 16, 2009

Greetings from Neapolis, Greece

NEAPOLIS VOION LAKONIA GREECE

 

Neapolis lies in the southest part of Lakonia. It’s a small seaside town facing the island of Kythira and Elafonisos. Around the area there are big sandy beaches as well as archeaological sites( Byzantine churches, castles and fortresses…. ). At the cape of Cavo Malias lies an old lighthouse and a monastery. Near an old traditional village named Kastania there exists a cave with stalagmites and stalactites and also near another village , named Agios Nikolaos lies a fossil forest.
Neapolis attracts a lot of visitors both Greeks and foreigners , as it’s a worth visiting place, because of the number of sights but ,above all ,the exceptional spirit of hospitality of the local people. There are hotels with reasonable prices you can stay in during your visit, and a lot of traditional tavernas and cafes for the visitors to enjoy “ouzo” with octopus grilled in a traditional way, which stands as the special trait of Neapolis
 
Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 12, 2009

Our Patron- John Paul II

 

John Paul II

John Paul II

We still remember John Paul II and we will always do. We want to follow his teaching. Every 16 October we celebrate our Patron’s Day.
Here you can find some basic information about him.

 Pope. Born Karol Józef Wojtyla on May 18, 1920, in Wadowice, Poland. John Paul’s early life was marked by great loss. His mother died when he was nine and his older brother Edmund died when he was twelve.

Growing up, John Paul was athletic and enjoyed skiing and swimming. He went to Krakow’s Jagiellonian University in 1938 where he showed an interest in theater and poetry. The school was closed the next year by Nazi troops during the German occupation of Poland. Wanting to become a priest, John Paul began studying at a secret seminary run by the archbishop of Krakow. After World War II ended, he finished his religious studies at a Krakow seminary and was ordained in 1946.

John Paul spent two years in Rome where he finished his doctorate in theology. He returned to his native Poland in 1948 and served in several parishes in and around Krakow. John Paul became the bishop of Ombi in 1958 and then the archbishop of Krakow six years later. Considered one of the Catholic Church’s leading thinkers, he participated in the Second Vatican Council—sometimes called Vatican II. The council began reviewing church doctrine in 1962 and held several sessions over the course of the next few years. As a member of the council, John Paul helped the church to examine its position in the world. Well regarded for his contributions to the church, John Paul was made a cardinal in 1967 by Pope Paul VI.

In 1978, John Paul made history by becoming the first non-Italian pope in more than four hundred years. As the leader of the Catholic Church, he traveled the world, visiting more than 100 countries to spread his message of faith and peace. But he was close to home when he faced the greatest threat to his life. In 1981, an assassin shot John Paul twice in St. Peter’s Square in Vatican City. Fortunately, he was able to recover from his injuries and later forgave his attacker.

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 12, 2009

Our Patron – Dimitrie Grecesu

He once said once that in science  good faith and truth are the most valuable things.

Dimitrie Grecescu was a modest person, avoiding noisy events, of great integrity and wide culture, which encompassed not only science but also literature, art, music. His professional activity was concentrated mainly in two directions, which he happily blended in: medicine and botany. Born in Cerneţi (Mehedinti), he attended the National School of Medicine and Pharmacy Carol Davila , institution which granted him the license in medicine (1863) and then he got his PhD in medicine, with a paper on medical botany (1868). He taught for many years (1869-1903) medical botany at the Faculty of Medicine of Bucharest, he was the manager of the Botanical Garden from Cotroceni and a member of the Romanian Academy (since 1907). At the same time, he worked as a military doctor, distinguishing especially during the Independence War.

Dimitrie Grecescu

Dimitrie Grecescu

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 11, 2009

Our Patron, Italy

In 2004, the school Liceo Scientifico has been dedicated  to Renato Caccioppoli. He was born on 20 January 1904, in Naples. His mother was Sofia Bakunin, daughter of Michele Bakunin.  Following  the wishes of his father, a known Neapolitan surgeon, Renato registered to Engineering, but then he attended  Mathematics. In 1925, he graduated at the University of Naples. In 1928, Renato qualified as an university teacher and then he went to Padua, where he won the competition for the chair of “Analisi Algebrica”. At the age of 28, the Academy of Lincei conferred him the national prize of the class of Physical Science. In 1934,he went back to Naples to teach The “Teoria dei Gruppi”, “ Analisi Superiore” and “Analisi Matematica”, until his death. His life was always quite problematic. His eccentric and nonconformist personality, profoundly antifascist, induced him to experiment the life of the vagrants and of poor people, he was arrested for mendacity. In 1938, he improvised a speech against Hitler and Mussolini, for this reason he was arrested and was interned in a mental home because people believed he was mad.  When he was released he continued to teach at university. Renato committed suicide in his home on 8 May 1959.

Our Patron

Our Patron

 

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 11, 2009

Our school in Scafati, Italy

The Liceo scientifico “Renato Caccioppoli” is a new building. It consists of 35 classrooms, offices,workshops and an informatics laboratory. There are also a library ,a hall to watch film and another one to listen to music. The building has got three floors.It is very sunny and is located in the plain just under the volcano Vesuvio.There is also a section of Liceo classico. In the school there aren’t only teenagers from Scafati, but also from neighbouring towns.

 

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 11, 2009

Scafati, Italy

Carmela team 

                                            OUR  TOWN SCAFATI

Scafati is a chaotic and dynamic town, an important industrial centre. The word “scafati” derives from the Latin word “scapha”, a means of transport used to sail the Sarno river. The story and the evolution of Scafati are tightly connected to his good geographic position between the two cities of Salerno and Naples and to the closeness to the town of Pompei. The first important settlements go back to the earthquake in 62 a.D and the eruption of the Vesuvio in 79 a.D.

The Palazzo Meyer (nowadays seat of the town hall) and the Wenner Park (a real green lung of the town) have a particular historic importance, they date back to XIX century.

During the Second World War Scafati was the protagonist of the first armed group resistant in South Italy, that contributed to the liberation of the territory from the Nazist invasion. In 1962 was assigned a gold medal to Scafati by the Associazione Nazionale Partigiani d’Italia.

 

 

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 11, 2009

Greetings from Romania

“Dimitrie Grecescu” school is the oldest school in our county. It is 157 years old and it consists of 8 classrooms, offices, one workshop, one informatics laboratory and one library. It is an old and beautifully decorated building, located in the center of the town. There are two churches near the school: a catholic one and an orthodox one and this help us to keep a close relationship with religion. It also includes a kindergarten with three groups. 

our_school-romania4

OUR SCHOOL

      

 

 

our_school-romania2

Posted by: Bozena Kraj | February 8, 2009

Greetings from Daleszyce, Poland!

 

Our school

Our school

We are John Paul II Junior High School in Daleszyce, Poland. Daleszyce is a town situated in the Holy Cross region famous for its beautiful Holy Cross Mountains, which are said to be the oldest in Europe, yet they are not very high. Our school is very big. It’s blue outside, but we say it’s full of sunshine inside. It’s friendly. There are over 4000 students there, both boys and girls. The building is very modern – it has even got lifts if someone has got problems with walking (broken legs). Can you see our school building?

Daleszyce and the landscape

Daleszyce and the landscape

Posted by: piccolamela | June 6, 2009

Pompei-The Amphitheatre

The Amphitheatre was built in about 80 B.C.. It hadn’t undergrounds under the level of the arena that was elliptic and surrounded by a parapet, decorated with paintings with scenes of fights. The cavea , that is the tiers, was divided in three flights of steps, the last one for women. Four passages allowed the admission to the cavea. Two places along these passages were used to assist the gladiators wounded in the fights. In the upper part there were the holes to support the velarium, the gigantic tarpaulin that was spread to shelter the audiences from the sun and the rain.
In the arena people ( the amphitheatre could contain about 20,000 people) could follow the fights among fierce beasts and gladiators or among gladiators. A lot of gladiators became famous. They were slaves or prisoners of war who tried to obtain the liberty. The performances took place initially in the forum, then in the amphitheatres.
These performances were born during the cruel funeral ceremonies , celebrated with the rite of the human sacrifice on the shrine of the dead to calm the fury of the infernal gods.

The Amphitheatre was built in about 80 B.C.. It hadn’t undergrounds under the level of the arena that was elliptic and surrounded by a parapet, decorated with paintings with scenes of fights. The cavea , that is the tiers, was divided in three flights of steps, the last one for women. Four passages allowed the admission to the cavea. Two places along these passages were used to assist the gladiators wounded in the fights. In the upper part there were the holes to support the velarium, the gigantic tarpaulin that was spread to shelter the audiences from the sun and the rain.
In the arena people ( the amphitheatre could contain about 20,000 people) could follow the fights among fierce beasts and gladiators or among gladiators. A lot of gladiators became famous. They were slaves or prisoners of war who tried to obtain the liberty. The performances took place initially in the forum, then in the amphitheatres.
These performances were born during the cruel funeral ceremonies , celebrated with the rite of the human sacrifice on the shrine of the dead to calm the fury of the infernal gods.

Posted by: piccolamela | June 6, 2009

AMALFI

The Maritime Republic of Amalfi

Amalfi was originally a Roman colony, which gained more and more importance over the centuries, and after the fall of the empire it became a diocese (596 AD).
Later, the whole coastline, along with Amalfi, became property of the Duchy of Naples, until 839, when the city declared its independence and became an autonomous republic. The Maritime Republic of Amalfi was soon to become an important maritime commercial centre, trading with the whole of the Italian peninsula, North Africa, the Middle East and the Byzantine Empire. The Republic bought spices, precious stones, carpets and fabrics from the Arabs, and sold them throughout Italy. The Maritime Republic of Amalfi was founded in 840, making it the oldest Italian maritime Republic. The Republic enjoyed its greatest prosperity in the second half of the nine hundreds and the ten hundreds. The Amalfi Maritime Tables, the world’s first maritime code, controlled shipping in much of the Mediterranean, and there were colonies of Amalfians conducting trade in many port cities. Soon, Amalfi’s wealth not only attracted the attention of pirates, who were promptly driven back by the city’s army, it also became the target of neighbouring states. In 1131, after a long succession of attacks, Amalfi was annexed to the Kingdom of Sicily, although still retaining a certain degree of autonomy in the management of maritime commercial affairs. Gradually, commercial relations with the East began to dwindle, checked by the policies of the Normans and Pisans, who landed on the coast in 1135, to plunder and destroy whatever they found there. The opulence of the Maritime Republic was by now but a memory, and maritime trade was limited to rare contacts with Southern Italy. A brief scientific and cultural revival occurred around the 1200s, the century in which Giovanni Gioia of Amalfi invented the compass. Over the following centuries, Amalfi’s population dropped considerably, mainly due to the continuing attacks on the zone by pirates. But the greatest disaster hit the region in 1643, when the plague took the lives of a third of the coastal population. One of the results of this tragedy was the progressive impoverishment of the area, aggravated by the interruption in maritime trade. The economy began to converge on the cultivation of olives, vines, and citrus fruits and on the crafts industry. Around the second half of the 19th century the Amalfi coast began its revival thanks to tourism, and artists such as Ibsen and Wagner drew inspiration from the region for some of their famous works, further fanning the curiosity of travellers to the coast.

The Cathedral in Amalfi dominates the principal square and it is the pride of the town.
It was dedicated to Vergine Assunta, patron saint of the town.
The Cathedral was built in a strategic position for the centrality and to defend, in fact it was built on a plane raised of 20metres above sea-level.

THE HISTORY

In origin the basilicas were two and both with three aisles: the first corresponds to the old Cathedral erected around the year 1000, the second erected in the IX century is more spacious. The two places of cult were used at the same time. The basilica was changed in the XIII century and the two places of cult were united in an only one with five aisles.

The outside
The present facade was built in the XIX century after the collapse of the original . On 24 December 1861 for a gust of wind, a strappado of the façade fell down.
Then there is the bell tower, that was restored in the XVIII century.
Interior

The largest portal presents a lunette, that contains a fresco of Domenico Morelli and Paolo Vetri, and a bronze door, coming from Costantinopoli.
The interior, readapted with baroque forms, has a basilican plan with transept and apse; the all
interior is covered with marbles and antique columns .The chapels preserve important works of art.

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VALLE DEI MULINI AMALFI
The Valley of the Mills constitutes the terminal part of the course of the Stream Reed before the same crosses the inhabited centre of Amalfi. The name of this portion of Valley derives from the installations of the mills for the industry of the alimentary pastas that later had to surrender to the competition of the industries of Torre del Greco, Torre Annunziata and Gragnano. Between the XII° and the XIII° century some mills were replaced by the paper mills, where started the production of a paper drawn by the maceration of the cotton rags, flax and hemp, with a native technique of China, imported from the Arabic countries and introduced in West and improved by the Amalfitanis.
The paper produced in Amalfi, called bambagina paper, was very appreciated especially the filigrees with coats of arms, symbols and sketches and spread in such a way that Federico II, in 1220, forbade the use for the public actions. During the ‘700 this activity reached its apex, but at the end of the 800 the missed mechanization of the productive trials caused a rapid decadence of all the paper mills. Of the sixteen paper mills that operated in the Valley only two are still active, while the other ones are deserted and damaged along the course of the Reed. At the beginning of the Valley of the Mills there is the Museum of the Paper, that picks up the machineries and the products of the workmanship of the paper.

Posted by: piccolamela | February 16, 2009

Schools involved in the project

General Lyceum of Neapolis Lakonias Greece

2nd Gymnasium of Tripolis Greece

Liceo Scientifico Classico R.Caccioppoli Scafati Italia

Gimnazjum im.Jana Paula II w Daleszyce Poland

Scoal cu cls.I-VIII nr 1 Romania

Necip Fazil Kisakurek Anadolu Lisesi Turkey

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